6501 North Meridian Street, Indianapolis, IN 46260      PH: 317.255.6647

ECC Curriculum

Kindergarten

We believe selecting a school is an important decision that will affect your child’s outlook, adjustment, and future success both in and out of the classroom. The Indianapolis Hebrew Congregation’s Early Childhood Center is proud to offer a private kindergarten program in which students develop a strong foundation in academics, social, emotional, creative, and physical skills. Our staff works hard to help each child develop confidence, a sense of self-worth, pride, and a love of learning.

The ECC curriculum is based on developmentally appropriate principles and practices. It is carefully framed around the research-based knowledge of how young children grow and learn and is both age and individually appropriate. The curriculum framework enhances the wide range of abilities and patterns of growth and maturation that occur in children and supports the unique learning modalities reflected in the multiple intelligences of every child.

 

Our program exceeds the Indiana State Standards for Kindergarten curriculum and includes enrichment programs like yoga, music, movement, cooking, JumpBunch, and Hebrew language. The ECC program includes flexibility by offering full-day kindergarten (9-3), with an option for extended daycare.

At the Early Childhood Center, children of all faith traditions are embraced. At the foundation of our learning are the core Jewish values of Indianapolis Hebrew Congregation: Sustaining and building a progressive Jewish Community through Torah, Prayer, and Repairing the World.

For more detailed information about our Kindergarten program please refer to our Kindergarten Parent Handbook. If you would like to schedule a tour or classroom visit, please contact Taryn Fartouh, ECC Director, at 317.254.2186.

Curriculum for Four Year Olds

Language Development
  • Stories
  • Poetry
  • Nursery rhymes
  • Fairy Tales
  • Color recognition
  • Alphabet recognition
  • Music
  • Drawing (pre-writing skill)
  • Encouraged to use words appropriately
  • Encouraged to share his/her own thoughts and feelings
  • Puppets
  • Free expression
  • Body language / sign language
  • Stories on tape
Science
  • Seasons (Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer)
  • Analyzing nature
  • Learning about life cycles, ourselves, and the world around us
  • Animals and their habitats (ex: Rainforest)
  • Transportation (air, water, land)
  • Weather
  • Bubbles
  • Machines
  • Outerspace
Health, Social, and Emotional Development
  • Sharing
  • Caring
  • Safety (fire, storms, tornados and personal safety)
  • Good hygiene
  • Dressing
  • Who am I?
  • Name, phone number, and address
  • Who should I look to if I am lost?
  • Feelings (sad, glad, mad, happy)
  • Respect
  • Responsibility to self and others
  • Nutritional awareness / Manners
  • Our five senses
Math
  • Number recognition and counting
  • Size (big, tall, short, small, middle)
  • Sequencing (first, next, last)
  • Patterns
  • Shapes
  • Time (morning, noon, and night)
  • Calendar (12 months, 7 days)
  • Measuring (cooking, water, and sand table)
Social Studies
  • Multicultural awareness
  • Historical awareness
  • Pioneers, Pilgrims, and Native Americans
  • Community helpers
Physical Education

Most 4-year-old children are energetic and very active. They enjoy engaging in rough-and-tumble play and attempt to do things that seem physically difficult. Such constant movement helps them learn to use and control their muscles. 

We encourage our children through:

  • In-room activities
  • Working on large and small motor skills (Jump Bunch)
  • Dancing/Exercising through Movement and Yoga
  • Free time on the playground
  • Playing with different types and sizes of balls and large manipulatives such as hoola hoops and bats.

Sensory Learning

Even before birth, a child begins using and learning through his or her senses. In fact, until the age of 6 or 7 (sometimes called the age of reason), learning greatly depends on the opportunities that a child has to use his or her 5 senses. The more senses that are used to experience something, the better the experience will be learned and remembered. Therefore, the more senses used = greater learning experience.

We encourage many multi-sensory opportunities for our children. An orange for snack provides an opportunity to touch, smell, taste, see, and hear a piece of fruit. We applaud/praise the children when they participate in positive ways like listening, touching appropriately, expressing themselves verbally, listening to the teachers and others, paying attention, and trying new things.

Curriculum for Three Year Olds

Language Development
  • Manners
  • Color recognition
  • Alphabet (letter recognition)
  • Drawing
  • Calendar
  • Show and Share
  • Music
  • Encourage independent thinking
  • Encourage appropriate word usage
    Science
    • Seasons
    • Bugs
    • Zoo animals
    • Farm animals
    • Ocean life
    • Animal tracking
    • Water play
    • Weather
    Health, Social, and Emotional Development
    • Feelings
    • Sharing/Caring
    • Nutrition
    • Senses
    • Safety
    • Respect
    • Responsibility (to self, class, others)
    • Watch out for strangers
    Math
    • Number recognition (1-10)
    • Counting
    • Size
    • Shapes
    • Calendar
    Social Studies
    • Pilgrims
    • Native Americans
    • Presidents
    • Class rules
    • Multicultural awareness
    Sensory Learning

    Even before birth, a child begins using and learning through his or her senses. In fact, until the age of 6 or 7 (sometimes called the age of reason), learning greatly depends on the opportunities that a child has to use his or her 5 senses. The more senses that are used to experience something, the better the experience will be learned and remembered. Therefore, the more senses used = greater learning experience.

    We encourage many multi-sensory opportunities for our children. An orange for snack provides an opportunity to touch, smell, taste, see, and hear a piece of fruit. We applaud/praise the children when they participate in positive ways like listening, touching appropriately, expressing themselves verbally, listening to the teachers and others, paying attention, and trying new things.

     

    Physical Education

    Most 3-year-old children are energetic and very active. They enjoy engaging in rough-and-tumble play and attempt to do things that seem physically difficult. Such constant movement helps them learn to use and control their muscles.

    We encourage our children through:

    • In-room activities
    • Working on large and small motor skills (Jump Bunch)
    • Dancing/Exercising through Movement and Yoga
    • Free time on the playground
    • Playing with different types and sizes of balls

    Curriculum for Two Year Olds

    Language Development
    • Manners
    • Verbal name recognition
    • Verbal color recognition
    • Animal recognition and sounds
    • Singing alphabet
    • Circle time
    • Visit our Early Childhood Library
    • Encourage independence
    • Encourage appropriate word usage
    Science
    • Seasons
    • Bugs
    • Zoo Animals
    • Farm Animals
    • Water Play
    Music
    • Rhythm and Beat
    • Clapping, marching, playing percussion instruments
    • Listening (Echo clapping, recordings, music styles)
    • Movement (Hopping, skipping, walking, snapping, swaying)
    Math
    • Counting (1-10 using objects)
    • Size (large and small)
    • Shapes (recognizing square, circle, triangle, rectangle using cut-outs and pictures)
    Health, Social, and Emotional Development
    • Feelings
    • Sharing/Caring
    • Nutrition
    • Senses
    • Safety
    • Respect
    • Responsibility (to self, class, others)
    • Watch out for strangers
    Social Studies
    • Multicultural awareness
    • Historical awareness
    • Pioneers, Pilgrims, and Native Americans
    • Community helpers

    Physical Education

    Most 2-year-old children are energetic and very active. They enjoy engaging in rough-and-tumble play and attempt to do things that seem physically difficult. Such constant movement helps them learn to use and control their muscles.

    We encourage our children through:

    • In-room activities (Playing with balls, working on large and small motor skills, dancing/exercising, etc.)
    • Learning how to follow the leader, while playing music. 
    • Setting up an obstacle course in the classroom and showing the children how to use it.
    • Free time on the playground
    • Playing ball. (We encourage the children to roll it back and forth, kick it, and sweep it around the room with a broom.)

    Curriculum for One Year Olds

    Language Development
    • Verbal name recognition
    • Verbal color recognition
    • Animal recognition and sounds
    • Singing alphabet
    • Circle time
    • Encourage appropriate word usage
    Science
    • Seasons
    • Bugs
    • Zoo Animals
    • Farm Animals
    • Water play
    Music

    One-year-olds are very curious about the human body. Having discovered their hands, feet, and mouth as a baby, they are now aware of their ears, eyes, elbows, arms, knees, and so on.

    We provide opportunities like the ones listed below to help your child learn the names of his or her body parts.

    • Play simple pointing games and songs.
    • Name body parts as they wash their hands.
    • Play mirror games.
    Social Development

    It is common for active toddlers to demand a lot of personal attention. However, they will gradually be able to play alone for short periods of time if they are secure in the fact that their teachers are close by.

    Toddlers play well near other children, but they have not yet developed the social skills to actively play with other toddlers. We find that children of this age love going on short walks, riding in buggies, and discovering the world.

    Math
    • Counting (using objects, fingers, toes, etc.)
    • Size (larger and smaller)
    • Shapes ( recognizing square, triangle, circle, rectangle)
    Health, Social, and Emotional Development
    • Feelings
    • Sharing/Caring
    • Nutrition (recognition and learning about foods)
    • Senses
    • Safety (following rules, not running, not hitting, etc.)
    • Respect
    • Responsibility (to self, class, others)
    • Watch out for strangers
    • Encourage independence (able to feed self, hold cup with two hands, drink with assistance )
    • Imitates gestures (peek-a-boo, bye-byes, pat-a-cake

     

    Physical Education
    • In-room activities
    • Playing with balls
    • Working on large and small motor skills, dance/exercising
    • Stretching/reaching, following the leader
    • Following simple directions (go to the chair, pick up the ball, listen)
    Play

    “Play” is merely the term adults attach to the activities of young children. In reality, a 1-year-old is busy seeking opportunities to learn about the objects in his or her environment. Children of this age are learning relationships; where things are located, which things go together, and what things do. A child is always watching and imitating the people (and possibly pets) around him or her. For instance, pretending to read, vacuuming, typing on a computer, or barking like a dog are just to name a few. Some of the play activities we encourage are:

    • Naming simple objects in picture books
    • Scribbling with crayons
    • Playing with toy cars, blocks, sand, and water
    • Playing with large push-or-pull toys
    • Fitting containers together

    Contact Us For More Information